Crafted to apply the best of reformed scholarship to the difficulties of ministry, Westminster’s MDiv immerses you in the Bible and gives you the skills to bring Christ to his people.

The Master of Divinity core courses . . .

Train you to read the Bible in its original languages

Teach you to understand how each book of the Bible fits with the whole

Orient you to the full scope of church history, from the ancient to modern era

Provide you with a comprehensive study of systematic theology

Equip you to defend the faith in a manner consistent with the Scriptures

 

Greek 1

This course provides the building blocks for further study by giving the foundation for a reading knowledge of Greek. Students will learn the Greek alphabet, grammar, and basic Greek syntax.

Greek 3

This course builds upon the reading knowledge of Koine Greek established in Greek 2 and explains the exegetical method that will be used in the rest of the New Testament courses at Westminster. Students will be equipped to trace an author’s flow of thought throughout a passage using discourse analysis.

Hebrew 2

This course builds on tools learned in Hebrew 1 with a specific focus on Hebrew syntax. At the conclusion of this course students will be prepared to translate any narrative passage in the Hebrew Bible.

Introduction to Apologetics

This course serves as an introduction to the method of defending the faith that is thoroughly biblical and self-consciously Reformed. This course will cover the biblical basis for apologetics, developing a world-and-life view, the issue of meaning, covenantal apologetics, engaging contemporary culture, and highlights in the history of apologetics. We will give special attention to the problem of meaning, the problem of evil, world religions (including Islam), science and faith, reason and revelation, and aesthetics.

Biblical Hermeneutics

In this course students will grow in their ability to understand, interpret, and apply the Bible. This course focuses on developing students’ ability to discover the meaning of biblical passages and answer related questions for themselves.

Old Testament History and Theology I

This course focuses on God’s unfolding plan of redemption in the book of Genesis in order to better understand its fulfillment in the Pentateuch and the rest of Scripture through the person and work of Jesus Christ. This will be accomplished through translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis of the Hebrew text.

Prophetical Books

This course focuses on the structure, content, and theology of the prophetic books of the Old Testament. Students will use exegetical methods, including discourse analysis of the original Hebrew, to understand how the message of the prophets fits into God’s plan of redemption by their fulfillment in Christ.

Introduction to New Testament I

Students will learn why some books are considered to be canonical and others are not, how the canon was formed, and why we can trust the current state of the canon. At the end of this course, students will be able to handle questions of textual criticism and learn how to decide between different textual variants.

The Gospels

This class focuses primarily on the four Gospels, and explores secular critical methods. Using exegesis of the texts in their original languages, students will better understand the kingdom of God in the message and ministry of Jesus, how this fits into the grand scheme of biblical theology, and how it relates to ministry today.

Hebrews to Revelation

This course covers the contents, distinctive features, themes, and major emphases of Hebrews, the General Epistles, and Revelation. Students will gain greater skill in exegeting portions of Hebrews through Revelation in Greek and understand their place in the flow of redemptive history and their overall canonical context.

Medieval Church

Int this course students will learn the major theological themes and personalities of the medieval church in light of the social and cultural contexts from the 6th to 16th centuries, from the Carolingian Era to the end of medieval Christendom. By studying the primary sources of the medieval period, students will better understand the continuities and discontinuities with the ancient church and the Reformation period.

The Church in the Modern Age

This course focuses on the people, events, and ideas that influenced the development of the church from the seventeenth century to today. This includes an examination of the historical context out of which theological distinctions within the modern church emerged.

Doctrine of God

This course explores the nature and character of God, including his triunity, simplicity, attributes, decrees, and more. Particular attention is paid to God’s revelation of himself in Scripture.

Doctrine of Christ

This course studies Christ and God’s accomplishment of salvation through him. Specific attention is given to both the central focus and comprehensive scope of this salvation as it relates to the person and work of Christ.

Doctrine of Salvation

This course explores the details of the accomplishment and application of salvation by Christ and the Holy Spirit. Students will study the whole scope of redemption throughout history, starting with the garden of Eden and culminating in the climactic establishment of the new heavens and new earth at Christ’s return.

Introduction to Pastoral Counseling

This course is an introduction to the pastor’s unique role as a physician of souls (iatroi psychoi) and counselor of God’s Word from a theologically Reformed perspective within the context of the local
church.

Peacemaking Pastor

This course presents a Reformed and Biblical theology of conflict and reconciliation in the context of pastoral ministry to equip pastors and church members to lay a foundation of biblical peacemaking in their local churches.

Practices of Leadership in the Local Church

This course builds on “Foundations for Leadership in the Local Church” with a biblical and historically Reformed orientation for leading in worship and the administration of the sacraments. Students will be equipped for leadership in the body of Christ, with an emphasis on establishing biblical vision, developing biblical strategy, and mobilizing the body for ministry and mission.

Evangelism & Missions in the Local Church

This course builds on “Theology of Evangelism and Missions” by instructing students in the habits and practice of personal evangelism. Students will explore the range of approaches for mobilizing missions through the church, and the relationship between evangelism and apologetics in various ministry contexts.

Greek 2

This course prepares students for further work in the New Testament by giving them a reading knowledge of Koine Greek. The course focuses on further Greek grammar, vocabulary, and more advanced syntax.

Hebrew 1

This course builds a foundational knowledge of biblical Hebrew, focusing on alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar. By the end of this course, students will be able to translate sections of Scripture and explore the beginning stages of Hebrew syntax.

Hebrew 3

This course reinforces the translational skills established in Hebrew 2 and moves on to the exegetical method that will be used in further Old Testament courses. Students will be equipped to analyse Hebrew narrative and discourse in order to discern the original author’s flow of thought.

Principles of Christian Apologetics

The purpose of this course will be to study in-depth the principles of a specifically Reformed, Christian apologetic. In doing so, students will look at some of the problems that have plagued both philosophy and non-Reformed apologetics in order to be better equipped to defend and commend the Christian faith.

Old Testament Introduction

In this course, students will be introduced to the various complex issues surrounding Old Testament interpretation. The course is designed to prepare students for subsequent work in Old Testament studies by giving them a foundational understanding of its character.

Old Testament History and Theology II

Picking up where OTHT 1 left off, this course focuses on God’s plan of redemptive history from Genesis through Esther, highlighting how the history of Israel finds its fulfilment in Christ. This course lays the foundation for further study in the Old Testament as students expand their skills in translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis.

Poetry & Wisdom

This course explores biblical Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature.Using translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis, students will explore the theological content and context of these books and discuss their relationship to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Introduction to New Testament II

Students will learn the methods, tools, and principles necessary for interpreting the New Testament in light of its historical backgrounds, such as the Old Testament and the Jewish and Greek literature contemporary to the New Testament. Students will become familiar with the interpretive problems in studying New Testament backgrounds and how to address them.

Acts and Pauline Epistles

This class will deepen understanding of Acts and the letters of Paul, especially exegetically and in a biblical-theological manner. It will deepen exegetical skills to achieve a better understanding of the argument and contents of the epistles and their place in Pauline biblical theology.

Ancient Church

This course will explore the key personalities, controversies, and theological developments that marked the first five centuries of the Christian church. Students will learn to articulate how the beliefs and practices of the early church developed and the cultural contexts that shaped the development of the church during the patristic period.

The Reformation

This course introduces major events, personalities, and ideas that shaped the Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries. Starting with the late medieval context of the Reformation, students will study Martin Luther, John Calvin, justification by faith, anabaptism, the Catholic Reformation, the Anglican settlements and the rise of Puritanism.

Prolegomena to Theology

This course provides a foundation for the study of theology as a whole. The primary focus is on the doctrine of Scripture and its authority in other fields of theological study. Students will learn the nature, method, and source of theology.

Doctrine of Man

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the understanding of man as a covenantal creature made in the image of God in all of its facets and aspects, covering both man’s inherent dignity and acquired depravity.

Christian Ethics

This course explores the scope and nature of Christian ethics by focusing on how the holy character and divine commandments of God serve as the foundational standards of human behavior. The course also walks through various secular ethical systems and refutes them with a biblical apologetic.

Doctrine of the Church

This course will cover basic biblical and historical themes in ecclesiology, including the kingdom of God, the body of Christ, the sacraments, and worship, among others. Students will gain an appreciation for and an ability to articulate the teaching of Scripture about the church.

Marriage Counseling in the Local Church

This course will provide students with a theological framework and methodological foundation for counseling couples, enabling students to move beyond complaints to the underlying dynamics that keep problems in place, including motives, desires, and relationship with God. This will all be based upon a biblical view of persons, relationships, and marriage.

Introduction to Pastoral Theology & Ministry

This course introduces students to the character and calling of the pastor and other ministry positions. Students explore the theology that underlies ministry, along with core competencies for pastoral ministry, especially prayer and preaching.

Theology of Evangelism and Missions

This course builds on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” and establishes a vision for evangelism and missions on a biblical and theological foundation. Students will survey the missionary activity of the church, and identify and address historic and contemporary challenges to faithful evangelistic and missionary endeavors, including contextualization.

Mentored Ministry Integration Seminar

This course provides opportunity for students to discuss practical, real-world situations that occur in pastoral ministry. It is designed to reflect a church leadership meeting, in which students put forth challenging pastoral issues that arise in their churches and work through them together with biblical wisdom.

Greek 1

This course provides the building blocks for further study by giving the foundation for a reading knowledge of Greek. Students will learn the Greek alphabet, grammar, and basic Greek syntax.

Greek 2

This course prepares students for further work in the New Testament by giving them a reading knowledge of Koine Greek. The course focuses on further Greek grammar, vocabulary, and more advanced syntax.

Greek 3

This course builds upon the reading knowledge of Koine Greek established in Greek 2 and explains the exegetical method that will be used in the rest of the New Testament courses at Westminster. Students will be equipped to trace an author’s flow of thought throughout a passage using discourse analysis.

Hebrew 1

This course builds a foundational knowledge of biblical Hebrew, focusing on alphabet, vocabulary, and grammar. By the end of this course, students will be able to translate sections of Scripture and explore the beginning stages of Hebrew syntax.

Hebrew 2

This course builds on tools learned in Hebrew 1 with a specific focus on Hebrew syntax. At the conclusion of this course students will be prepared to translate any narrative passage in the Hebrew Bible.

Hebrew 3

This course reinforces the translational skills established in Hebrew 2 and moves on to the exegetical method that will be used in further Old Testament courses. Students will be equipped to analyse Hebrew narrative and discourse in order to discern the original author’s flow of thought.

Introduction to Apologetics

This course serves as an introduction to the method of defending the faith that is thoroughly biblical and self-consciously Reformed. This course will cover the biblical basis for apologetics, developing a world-and-life view, the issue of meaning, covenantal apologetics, engaging contemporary culture, and highlights in the history of apologetics. We will give special attention to the problem of meaning, the problem of evil, world religions (including Islam), science and faith, reason and revelation, and aesthetics.

Principles of Christian Apologetics

The purpose of this course will be to study in-depth the principles of a specifically Reformed, Christian apologetic. In doing so, students will look at some of the problems that have plagued both philosophy and non-Reformed apologetics in order to be better equipped to defend and commend the Christian faith.

Biblical Hermeneutics

In this course students will grow in their ability to understand, interpret, and apply the Bible. This course focuses on developing students’ ability to discover the meaning of biblical passages and answer related questions for themselves.

Old Testament Introduction

In this course, students will be introduced to the various complex issues surrounding Old Testament interpretation. The course is designed to prepare students for subsequent work in Old Testament studies by giving them a foundational understanding of its character.

Old Testament History and Theology I

This course focuses on God’s unfolding plan of redemption in the book of Genesis in order to better understand its fulfillment in the Pentateuch and the rest of Scripture through the person and work of Jesus Christ. This will be accomplished through translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis of the Hebrew text.

Old Testament History and Theology II

Picking up where OTHT 1 left off, this course focuses on God’s plan of redemptive history from Genesis through Esther, highlighting how the history of Israel finds its fulfilment in Christ. This course lays the foundation for further study in the Old Testament as students expand their skills in translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis.

Prophetical Books

This course focuses on the structure, content, and theology of the prophetic books of the Old Testament. Students will use exegetical methods, including discourse analysis of the original Hebrew, to understand how the message of the prophets fits into God’s plan of redemption by their fulfillment in Christ.

Poetry & Wisdom

This course explores biblical Hebrew poetry and wisdom literature.Using translation, exegesis, and discourse analysis, students will explore the theological content and context of these books and discuss their relationship to the gospel of Jesus Christ.

Introduction to New Testament I

Students will learn why some books are considered to be canonical and others are not, how the canon was formed, and why we can trust the current state of the canon. At the end of this course, students will be able to handle questions of textual criticism and learn how to decide between different textual variants.

Introduction to New Testament II

Students will learn the methods, tools, and principles necessary for interpreting the New Testament in light of its historical backgrounds, such as the Old Testament and the Jewish and Greek literature contemporary to the New Testament. Students will become familiar with the interpretive problems in studying New Testament backgrounds and how to address them.

The Gospels

This class focuses primarily on the four Gospels, and explores secular critical methods. Using exegesis of the texts in their original languages, students will better understand the kingdom of God in the message and ministry of Jesus, how this fits into the grand scheme of biblical theology, and how it relates to ministry today.

Acts and Pauline Epistles

This class will deepen understanding of Acts and the letters of Paul, especially exegetically and in a biblical-theological manner. It will deepen exegetical skills to achieve a better understanding of the argument and contents of the epistles and their place in Pauline biblical theology.

Hebrews to Revelation

This course covers the contents, distinctive features, themes, and major emphases of Hebrews, the General Epistles, and Revelation. Students will gain greater skill in exegeting portions of Hebrews through Revelation in Greek and understand their place in the flow of redemptive history and their overall canonical context.

Ancient Church

This course will explore the key personalities, controversies, and theological developments that marked the first five centuries of the Christian church. Students will learn to articulate how the beliefs and practices of the early church developed and the cultural contexts that shaped the development of the church during the patristic period.

Medieval Church

Int this course students will learn the major theological themes and personalities of the medieval church in light of the social and cultural contexts from the 6th to 16th centuries, from the Carolingian Era to the end of medieval Christendom. By studying the primary sources of the medieval period, students will better understand the continuities and discontinuities with the ancient church and the Reformation period.

The Reformation

This course introduces major events, personalities, and ideas that shaped the Reformation of the 16th and 17th centuries. Starting with the late medieval context of the Reformation, students will study Martin Luther, John Calvin, justification by faith, anabaptism, the Catholic Reformation, the Anglican settlements and the rise of Puritanism.

The Church in the Modern Age

This course focuses on the people, events, and ideas that influenced the development of the church from the seventeenth century to today. This includes an examination of the historical context out of which theological distinctions within the modern church emerged.

Prolegomena to Theology

This course provides a foundation for the study of theology as a whole. The primary focus is on the doctrine of Scripture and its authority in other fields of theological study. Students will learn the nature, method, and source of theology.

Doctrine of God

This course explores the nature and character of God, including his triunity, simplicity, attributes, decrees, and more. Particular attention is paid to God’s revelation of himself in Scripture.

Doctrine of Man

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the understanding of man as a covenantal creature made in the image of God in all of its facets and aspects, covering both man’s inherent dignity and acquired depravity.

Doctrine of Christ

This course studies Christ and God’s accomplishment of salvation through him. Specific attention is given to both the central focus and comprehensive scope of this salvation as it relates to the person and work of Christ.

Christian Ethics

This course explores the scope and nature of Christian ethics by focusing on how the holy character and divine commandments of God serve as the foundational standards of human behavior. The course also walks through various secular ethical systems and refutes them with a biblical apologetic.

Doctrine of Salvation

This course explores the details of the accomplishment and application of salvation by Christ and the Holy Spirit. Students will study the whole scope of redemption throughout history, starting with the garden of Eden and culminating in the climactic establishment of the new heavens and new earth at Christ’s return.

Doctrine of the Church

This course will cover basic biblical and historical themes in ecclesiology, including the kingdom of God, the body of Christ, the sacraments, and worship, among others. Students will gain an appreciation for and an ability to articulate the teaching of Scripture about the church.

Introduction to Pastoral Counseling

This course is an introduction to the pastor’s unique role as a physician of souls (iatroi psychoi) and counselor of God’s Word from a theologically Reformed perspective within the context of the local
church.

Marriage Counseling in the Local Church

This course will provide students with a theological framework and methodological foundation for counseling couples, enabling students to move beyond complaints to the underlying dynamics that keep problems in place, including motives, desires, and relationship with God. This will all be based upon a biblical view of persons, relationships, and marriage.

Peacemaking Pastor

This course presents a Reformed and Biblical theology of conflict and reconciliation in the context of pastoral ministry to equip pastors and church members to lay a foundation of biblical peacemaking in their local churches.

Introduction to Pastoral Theology & Ministry

This course introduces students to the character and calling of the pastor and other ministry positions. Students explore the theology that underlies ministry, along with core competencies for pastoral ministry, especially prayer and preaching.

Practices of Leadership in the Local Church

This course builds on “Foundations for Leadership in the Local Church” with a biblical and historically Reformed orientation for leading in worship and the administration of the sacraments. Students will be equipped for leadership in the body of Christ, with an emphasis on establishing biblical vision, developing biblical strategy, and mobilizing the body for ministry and mission.

Theology of Evangelism and Missions

This course builds on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” and establishes a vision for evangelism and missions on a biblical and theological foundation. Students will survey the missionary activity of the church, and identify and address historic and contemporary challenges to faithful evangelistic and missionary endeavors, including contextualization.

Evangelism & Missions in the Local Church

This course builds on “Theology of Evangelism and Missions” by instructing students in the habits and practice of personal evangelism. Students will explore the range of approaches for mobilizing missions through the church, and the relationship between evangelism and apologetics in various ministry contexts.

Mentored Ministry Integration Seminar

This course provides opportunity for students to discuss practical, real-world situations that occur in pastoral ministry. It is designed to reflect a church leadership meeting, in which students put forth challenging pastoral issues that arise in their churches and work through them together with biblical wisdom.

With five pastoral theology courses that are exclusive to this degree track, the Pastoral emphasis gives you the most robust training for pastoral ministry offered at Westminster.

Theology & Practice of Preaching

This course builds on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” with a focus on the theology of preaching. Students apply hermeneutical foundations to the disciplines of preaching, and practice the disciplines of expository preaching with a sermon in a “lab” context.

Expository Preaching from the Old Testament

This course builds on “Theology and Practice of Preaching” by developing the hermeneutics and discipline of preaching expository sermons from Old Testament genres. Students will preach two sermons from the OT in a “lab” context.

Exposition and Sermon Delivery in Pastoral Ministry

Emphasizing evangelistic and apologetic preaching, this course focuses on the delivery of expository sermons in diverse pastoral situations. The course includes “lab” experience in which students practice two sermons in a particular pastoral context.

Expository Preaching from the New Testament

This course builds on “Theology and Practice of Preaching” by developing the hermeneutics and discipline of preaching expository sermons from New Testament genres. Students will preach two sermons from the NT in a “lab” context.

Foundations for Leadership in the Local Church

In this course students will build on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” by developing a biblical theology of leadership and offices in the church. Topics include: the character required of church leaders, and the practice of shepherd-leadership in the context of Presbyterian church polity.

Electives

The remaining 3 credits for Pastoral Ministry emphasis students can be from courses from any department (Apologetics, Systematic Theology, Church History, New Testament, Old Testament, Pastoral Theology).

Theology & Practice of Preaching

This course builds on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” with a focus on the theology of preaching. Students apply hermeneutical foundations to the disciplines of preaching, and practice the disciplines of expository preaching with a sermon in a “lab” context.

Expository Preaching from the New Testament

This course builds on “Theology and Practice of Preaching” by developing the hermeneutics and discipline of preaching expository sermons from New Testament genres. Students will preach two sermons from the NT in a “lab” context.

Expository Preaching from the Old Testament

This course builds on “Theology and Practice of Preaching” by developing the hermeneutics and discipline of preaching expository sermons from Old Testament genres. Students will preach two sermons from the OT in a “lab” context.

Foundations for Leadership in the Local Church

In this course students will build on “Introduction to Pastoral Theology and Ministry” by developing a biblical theology of leadership and offices in the church. Topics include: the character required of church leaders, and the practice of shepherd-leadership in the context of Presbyterian church polity.

Exposition and Sermon Delivery in Pastoral Ministry

Emphasizing evangelistic and apologetic preaching, this course focuses on the delivery of expository sermons in diverse pastoral situations. The course includes “lab” experience in which students practice two sermons in a particular pastoral context.

Electives

The remaining 3 credits for Pastoral Ministry emphasis students can be from courses from any department (Apologetics, Systematic Theology, Church History, New Testament, Old Testament, Pastoral Theology).

With four more elective courses than the Pastoral emphasis, the General Studies emphasis trains you for pastoral ministry while also giving you the ability to pursue your unique theological interests — whether that’s tracing the history of a local congregation, diving deeply into the relationship between the image of God and sexuality, or getting a firmer grasp on Van Til’s apologetic method.

Gospel Communication

In this course, students will learn to articulate a biblical theology of worship as it unfolds from Genesis through Revelation, and will engage meaningfully and graciously in current conversations about liturgy and worship culture. The ultimate goal of this course is for students to gain access to a wide range of resources for building and executing a service of worship.

Electives

The remaining 11 credits for General Studies emphasis students can be from courses from any department (Apologetics, Systematic Theology, Church History, New Testament, Old Testament, Pastoral Theology).

Gospel Communication

In this course, students will learn to articulate a biblical theology of worship as it unfolds from Genesis through Revelation, and will engage meaningfully and graciously in current conversations about liturgy and worship culture. The ultimate goal of this course is for students to gain access to a wide range of resources for building and executing a service of worship.

Electives

The remaining 11 credits for General Studies emphasis students can be from courses from any department (Apologetics, Systematic Theology, Church History, New Testament, Old Testament, Pastoral Theology).

By the Numbers

3–4
years to degree completion
111
Credit hours of coursework
47
students in last year’s graduating class

Mentored Ministry

A biblical understanding of wisdom forbids separating knowing from doing, learning from practice, since wisdom unites knowledge, character, and skill. Wisdom results from academic learning and practical experience when accompanied by supervision and self-examination. Candidates for the MDiv degree are therefore required to participate in mentored field experience in ministry. All arrangements for Mentored Ministry requirements are handled through the Student Development Office. This program targets key areas of ministry to put into practice the distinctive curriculum from the classroom.

Link Here

What Our Alumni Say

“Studying biblical theology at Westminster Theological Seminary was a life-shaping experience for me. This has brought joy to my Christian experience and spiritual vitality to my ministry.”


— Philip Ryken
President, Wheaton College

What Our Alumni Say

“On the university campus where I minister today, grounding one’s life in Scripture as God’s trustworthy and true Word has never been more significant. Westminster has significantly strengthened my anchor in the Word, from which I am far better equipped to send out rescue lines to the campus.”


— Ben Jackson
Campus Minister for Coalition for Christian Outreach, Mississippi State University

What Our Alumni Say

“I will always be grateful to God for the education I received at WTS. I have been a church planter, church pastor, and military chaplain for 32 years since my graduation from the MDiv program. In every venue where the Lord has led me, the tools and training in the Holy Scriptures I received from my teachers at WTS have been used by God in my life and ministry.”


— Christopher H. Wisdom
Vice President and Professor of Practical Theology, Erskine Theological Seminary

What Our Alumni Say

“Simply put, if it had not been for my education at Westminster, I would be an ineffective RUF campus minister at UC Berkeley. Westminster captured my imagination for the beauty, believability, and bounty of Scripture. And by God’s grace, that same message is capturing the hearts of Berkeley students.”


— Chase Daws
RUF Campus Minister, UC Berkeley

Frequently Asked Questions

What MDiv scholarship opportunities are currently available?

Most MDiv students receive scholarships that cover 25–100% of their tuition. For more information regarding scholarships, contact admissions@wts.edu.

How long is the MDiv program?

The MDiv requires 111 credit hours and can be completed in three or four years. The standard track is four years. The three-year track is much more intense and demanding but certainly possible for the determined student. The coursework can also be completed on a part-time schedule, with the requirement that all credits are completed within 10 years.

How do the different MDiv degree emphases work?

There are two MDiv degree emphases: pastoral ministry and general studies. The pastoral ministry emphasis includes five required pastoral theology courses. The general studies emphasis gives four more elective courses than the pastoral emphasis, giving you the ability to pursue your unique theological interests. The first menu on this page offers a full list of courses required for MDiv students.

Is the MDiv offered as an online course?

Westminster believes that training for pastoral ministry should be done in a residential setting with personal access to both professors and fellow students. However, you will have the opportunity to take counseling courses through our online program if you choose counseling electives.